Unboxing the Bushbuddy Trekker Ultra 004 Wood Stove

P1040191A few weeks ago (4 to be exact), I broke down and placed an order with the Nomadic Stove Company for the lightest Bushbuddy stove available, the Trekker Ultra 004. Without crossing hairs, I have used the Solo Stove for a while now, and found that I was really happy with the way the stove performed, as well as how clean and easy it was to use, however, I wasn’t too happy with the weight. So, I gave in and dropped $110 on the original, hand-made design, that weighs almost half of what the Solo Stove clocks in at!

When the stove finally came in today, I was like a kid at Christmas! I began to tear into the box, but I stopped myself… I figured that I should take a moment and record the unboxing, then I could share it with everyone… (And now, if anyone else orders one, now they will know what to expect when it shows up!)

So, when I pulled the stove out of the box, I found it to be as beautiful as I had imagined it would be. There is just something to say about an item that is completely hand-made, in the state of Alaska, USA, of all places! I love that I can see each little weld spot. Each piece of this stove is cut and pieced together… and I must say, the fit and finish is simply amazing! Oh… and I have no doubt that it will perform just as beautifully as it looks…

BBU4 Boxed P1040174 P1040238 P1040245 P1040247 P1040201 P1040221Some time back, I picked up a Snow Peak Trek 900 titanium cook pot and a matching titanium lid from 4 Dog Stove. The Bushbuddy will nest perfectly inside this cook pot, which is the reason I bought the cook pot. I have also picked up a cuben stuff sack for the cook pot from ZPacks, and made a DIY reflectix cozy to fit around the cook pot. This all fits neatly inside the stuff sack, and everything comes in at 10.4 oz. Not the lightest cook kit I have, but keep in mind, this is for a 900 ml size cook pot, and does not require me to carry any fuel (we all know the benefits of using wood as our fuel).

Of course, the Snow Peak cook pot is quite durable, as is the lid from 4 Dog Stove, however, I will admit, the Bushbuddy Ultra 004 is not quite as durable. There are a few Bushbuddy stoves available, with the Trekker 004 being the lightest, and naturally, least durable version. The “004” refers to the thickness of the outer wall, which surprisingly is made of the “highest grade USA stainless steel” as opposed to titanium (which I at one time assumed it to be). Due to this feature, it is recommended “to store the stove wrapped inside a piece of linen and stowed inside a pot,” which is also the reason I chose the Snow Peak Trek 900 cook pot.

P1040254 P1040259 P1040267 P1040280So, it’s obvious, I haven’t even set a piece of wood in the stove as of yet, but I have plans to! I am looking forward to firing it up ASAP! Maybe as night-time falls… (I’ll be sure to add a photo of it burning if I do…)

Here is a photo of the stove burning out… a video is uploading right now!

BBU4 BurningAnd here is the initial break in video:

And here is a top down burn in the stove:

Anyway, for what it’s worth, after unboxing the stove, I am very happy with it. It looks clean, appears to be well assembled. There are no loose pieces anywhere, and it is light! According to the site, these are listed at 5.1 oz, however, mine comes in at a smooth 5 oz, even! So, as time goes on, and I use the stove more, I will be sure to include it in more videos, and share more of my thoughts on it… Until then, thanks for stopping by!

~Stick~

Disclaimer: I paid the full price for this stove with my own money. I am not obligated to write about this stove, nor am I being paid, or compensated for it in any way. The statements in this post is of my own opinion, which I formed after personally handling the stove (for a brief period of time).

 

About Stick

My blog is essentially a record of my hiking career. Through it, I, and others, can see how I have evolved from a heavy weight backpacker, to a smarter, more efficient, lightweight backpacker. Through the use of video, still photos, and of course writing, one can see my progression, as well as check out some of the places I hike, and not to mention some cool, lightweight gear options. For me, my blog is a journal, but for others, I hope that it is an interactive learning tool to aid them in their own progression towards lightweight backpacking.
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12 Responses to Unboxing the Bushbuddy Trekker Ultra 004 Wood Stove

  1. Achilles says:

    I wonder what impact fire bans in you local parks have on using wood stoves? I was just in ADK last weekend and there is a park wide ban on wood fires… I was using an alky stove so it wasn’t an issue but ranger presence checking sites was heavy and you would instantly know the difference by smell.

    Great looking stove!

    Like

    • Stick says:

      Achilles,

      As a whole area, I have never been in a fire ban area… there are a few places though that it is not allowed, such as on Blood Mountian on the AT right before Neels Gap. So, I can’t really say much about it… But I will say that I am surprised that you were allowed to use an alcohol stove in a fire ban area. I was under the assumption that in a fire ban, the only stoves that could be used were those that had an on/off switch, which ruled out wood, esbit, and alcohol.

      As far as the Bushbuddy though… I love it! I have a hike coming up in a couple of weeks that I plan to carry it on… well, depending on the anticipated weather. 🙂

      Thanks for stopping by!

      ~Stick~

      Like

    • Achilles says:

      I should say Campfire ban (wood burning). It was a canister/ alcohol stove only (such as Yosemite, ADK, etc).

      Like

  2. Stick – good review. I love my wood stove but it is not for backpacking. Here in the UK all our wild walking and camping is without trees as sheep over the centuries have made sure that most hills and mountains don’t have forest so this would not be suitable for my trips. Real pity because a fire is always a great thing to have at the end of a day’s walking.

    Like

    • Stick says:

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting! And I agree, at the end of a day, a fire is a nice thing to have, which is another benefit to this stove… 🙂

      ~Stick~

      Like

  3. GreenPackin' says:

    Reblogged this on GreenPackin' and commented:
    The Bushbuddy stove is one that I’ve read up on before but never took the time to really look into it. Take a look at this piece about the Bushbuddy.

    Like

  4. Stick, as usual great review. I have several wood burning stoves, some I have made. One of them is almost identical to the one you reviewed except it is adjustable with rotation of the outer and inner section, opening and closing air intake ports. It works great unless it is a rainy day out on the trail. I found wet wood does not burn well and smokes a lot. You could pack your own wood but what if you need more and it is raining. There are always drawbacks no matter which type of stove you have. I also hated the black soot buildup on the pots. To me alcohol stoves are so much cleaner burning, just bring enough alcohol. I also designed a wood burner stove with an alcohol burner inserted. Then I had the best of both worlds except it was heavier. $110 seems pretty salty for me and yet with hand make work in producing stoves you are not making much money for the time as I know.

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    • Stick says:

      Steve,

      I actually made one similar to this a few years ago out of a small paint can and a Progressive soup can. I never could get it to work right though… then again, it may have been that I didn’t know what I was doing at that time too..

      I agree that in wet conditions, this stove would (for me anyway) become a bit of a chore to use. I know this from past experiences with using wood stoves in wet conditions… but it can be done. And yep, wet wood is a bit smokier, but if it’s heating my food that is fine by me too… What I like about this set up is that my pot is contained inside the cozy, so no soot issues there, and the stove is the best I have used at containing the soot, so no mess there either! 🙂

      I also agree that for most, there is no perfect stove. I like them all though… which one I carry just depends on my goal for that hike.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      ~Stick~

      Like

  5. Allen Bishop says:

    I like the looks of the whole kit, very nice job. Looking forward to the next segment, been leaning toward a wood burner for some time, just haven’t pulled the trigger.

    Like

    • Stick says:

      Allen,

      For me, for a 100% wood burner, this is my favorite that I have tried so far, although keep in mind, I haven’t tried many. But as a system, it just works… and what gets me the most is how clean it is…

      Anyway, I am uploading a burn video right now. Hopefully in about 30 minutes I will be done with it and can share it… 🙂

      ~Stick~

      Like

  6. Mike says:

    Great review, I’ve got one of the originals and an .006 and really love them. Hope you do some follow-up posts after playing with it some. Keep trying to convince myself I can justify spending $225 for the Suluk 46’s TDW titanium version at 2.75 oz http://suluk46.com/products%20%20-%20P14%20TDW%20Stove.html

    Like

    • Stick says:

      Mike,

      I had/have no doubts about this stove… from what I can tell, it is definitely a proven stove. And from my experience with the Solo Stove, I love the design! As for the Suluk 46, yeah, I have often contemplated that too… John Abela has/had (?) one… and it is tempting. But, that is a bit more than I want to pay. Honestly, the $110 for this one is what took me so long to finally get this one… it has been on my wish list for the past year and a half! 🙂 Glad to finally have it though.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      ~Stick~

      Like

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